Endangered Species Act in Danger

Two weeks ago I wrote about the Endangered Species Act, specifically how the Act saved the long-nosed bat in the Southwest of the United States. GOP leaders in Congress are considering repealing this act which has been in place since 1973. This means animals and plants currently protected are in danger of extinction if their habitats are opened up for use.

http://www.ecowatch.com/gut-endangered-species-act-2261617185.html

Many animals in the US have been saved by the ESA, including our national symbol, the Bald Eagle. In 1963, the Bald Eagle was down to 487 mating pairs due to the use of DDT as a pesticide. The species was in danger of extinction. In 2007 the Bald Eagle was removed from the protected list as the species has recovered with 4,215 pairs in the wild. Without this government intervention, we may have lost our national symbol. Once an animal is extinct, it cannot be recovered.

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http://www.livescience.com/54707-endangered-species-act.html

You can help! Below I have links to petitions you can sign.

http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/do-not-repeal-and-replace?source=s.tw&r_by=1458934

https://www.change.org/p/protect-the-endangered-species-act?recruiter=3571451

Also please call or write your representatives in congress to know you support the Environmental Species Act.

Find your representatives: http://www.house.gov/representatives/find/

 

Why I donated to NRDC in 2016

In 2016, I decided to donate 10% of my revenue (revenue, not profit) of all pieces I sold online and at shows to National Resources Defense Council. For me, as a small business owner and stay-at-home mom, that’s a lot of money. I could easily have used that money for our family, but I passionately feel it’s time to support institutions in which we believe, and here’s why I choose the NRDC.

  1. Nature inspires me. And I want to protect these spaces and animals so future generations can enjoy our wild open spaces.
  2. We only have one Earth. Our survival as a species depends on us having a habitable place to live. As much as we like to dream of traveling to or living on Mars and other planets, that’s not going to be a reality for a long time to come. Our water, our food: this is life. And without these things, we will die.
  3. Science and facts are important, and the work of the NRDC is determined by science that shows us where our environment is vulnerable. Without science and facts to show where we are failing, we wont be able to stop and reverse damage to the Earth. This could result in permanent and even irreversible damage.

Today the NRDC filed a lawsuit against the Trump administration to not delay protection of the rusty patched bumble bee. I’m proud that my donation is helping to make this possible!

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/feds-sued-over-delay-in-protecting-endangered-bumblebees-2017-02-14

The Endangered Species Act works!

The Endangered Species Act has been instrumental in saving a multitude of species. Recent report shows the complete recovery of the long-nosed bat and gypsum wild buckwheat, and a downgrading of the Kuenzler hedgehog cactus, showing significant progress in recovery. Conservation advocate Michael Robinson cites the act has saved from extinction 99% of the animals and plants under it’s care. Additionally, 2016 marked the year in which the most species partially or fully recovered, than any year prior.

Why is reducing extinction important? We know species do naturally go extinct, but man’s influence on the natural world is undeniable: simply by expanding our population and living areas, we impact the natural world that’s been inhabiting those areas for long before us. We move and displace creatures and plants, with little understanding of the environments and biodiversity in the area we’re moving into. By not understanding the impact, we can’t make informed decisions on what we need and want to protect. Once a species or plant is gone, we cannot bring it back; by allowing species and plants to go extinct we could be impacting the world in negative ways that we can’t describe now without the proper information.

I’m proud to be donating a portion of sales to NRDC, which works to protect biodiversity, wildlife and unspoiled lands.

http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/news/press_releases/2017/lesser-long-nosed-bat-gypsum-wild-buckwheat-01-05-2017.php

http://www.seeker.com/bats-tequila-2184865208.html

Each Piece is a Donation to National Resources Defense Council

My inspiration comes from nature and science. I’m always inspired by trees, animals and the outdoors. That is why I’ve decided to donate 10% of the purchase price of every product to the National Resources Defense Council, or NRDC. The NRDC works with clean energy, reducing climate change, protecting animals, clean water initiatives, safe food, ocean health, and more. Click here to see their 2015 Annual report, showing where donated money is spent.

I had several criteria that needed to be met when making my choice. It was important to me to support a charity that worked inside the United States and outside and to support a charity that helped animals as well as clean energy and addressing climate change. It was important to me to donate to a charity that was efficient with donations and is successful at committing donated money to the stated causes with little overhead. NRDC met all these requirements!

http://www.nrdc.com

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New Work in the Store

I’m very excited to announce new work available in the store: Jackrabbit and Mars Rover prints. These are prints of original artwork, and are available in 2 sizes: 8×10 and 16×20.

The originals are pastel on paper. I decided to recreate my most popular jewelry pieces in prints, because of feedback from customers that they liked my designs but would like them in other formats than jewelry. I hope you like them too!

Jackrabbit 8×10 Link  |  Jackrabbit 16×20 Link

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Mars Rover 8×10  |  MarsRover 16×20

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What I’m Thankful For

This Thanksgiving season I think it’s especially important for us all to remember  what we’re thankful for. I’m going to take the day to enjoy my family, reach out to family that is far away, and reflect on the good in my life.

First, I’m thankful for my health and security. So many people around the world right now are living, working and trying to raise families in difficult situations: oppressive government; war zones; famine and drought stricken areas. I can express myself in anyway I please, disagree with people, criticize my government, walk in my neighborhood without fear, and for all these things I am grateful every day.

Second, I’m thankful to my family for supporting me. Starting a business and being an artist are both difficult prospects. It’s a lot of work, and a lot of different types of work, and without my family to support me, I wouldn’t be able to do it.

Third, I’m thankful to have a way to express myself, and to be supported by my fans. I always love when people buy my products, but when you see someone’s face light up when they see your work, or get that special email of thanks, that’s a feeling money can’t buy.

I hope your day is filled with loved ones and delicious food and relaxation. Happy Thanksgiving!!

 

SF Etsy Holiday Emporium

I’m excited to announce I’ll be vending at the San Francisco Etsy Holiday Emporium taking place Saturday November 26 and Sunday November 27 at Pier 70. This show features over 200 of the most unique and high-quality Etsy vendors. And by supporting Etsy vendors, you’re supporting small, local businesses that are making our neighborhoods more prosperous. Give the gift of handmade this holiday season!

https://www.facebook.com/events/1599973353635027/

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Bridging the Gap

I’m always excited by ways we can bridge the gap between humanities and sciences. When I was in college in the 90’s as a fine art major, I had NO requirement for science or technology courses. I intentionally took technology courses because I always felt university was there to make me a well-rounded person, and I wanted to learn about all sorts of things, not just art.

This article surfaces ways that the sciences and humanities are coming together to answer big questions together. I hope future generations of college students will be able to take advantage of bringing together not just diverse perspectives, but diverse people to solve all kinds of problems.

http://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2016/09/21/494837130/a-new-culture-of-cooperation-in-academia-is-emerging

Manufacturing and Robots

Despite Trump’s promises, manufacturing jobs are not coming back to the US and here is why: most of the manufacturing jobs are lost due to robots and automation. The reality is computers and robots do repetitive, mundane tasks better than humans. They always have and they always will, and as we move to more efficient technology and smarter AI, this will be true more than ever.

The factories may be coming back, but the jobs are not. There will be some jobs generated, but not in the amount people are hoping for.

Instead of focusing on the past, we need to embrace the opportunities in front of us. Implement programs to retrain workers to do jobs difficult for robots. Help people learn to use and understand technology, so we have a diverse workforce to solve problems. Create social safety nets, to help people who are transitioning between jobs and careers. There is still a lot of work to do, and we have people that want to work. We need to get better at connecting people to the work that needs to be done!

https://techcrunch.com/2016/11/09/trump-promises-to-bring-back-manufacturing-jobs-but-robots-wont-let-him/